The Art of War

What comes in your head when you hear the word “war”? Blood? Death? Anger, wrath, swords, guns, daggers, spears, cannons… you name it.

But the word war does not only refer to physical conflict. It may also refer to personal battles, self-denial and self-discipline.

So how does one fight a war?

Well, someone wrote about it.

His name was Sun Tzu.

“The Art of War” is a book written by Sun Tzu, a strategist who lived two thousand and a half years ago. The book was originally intended for literal war, meaning that it was really written for use in physical warfare. But amazingly, this book has found its way to more practical uses. Now, it is a guide to personal battles, to struggles within the mind, to personal dilemnas. Intrigued, I decided to buy a copy. When I read it, imagine the disappointment I had! I didn’t understand it! All it was saying was: “Location, location, location!… And some tactics…”

But no longer…

The “Art of War” made me think… “How does one apply this in life?”, “How does one understand such a book?”. It really made me think of the what’s, the how’s and the why’s. And my understanding grew. I never knew a book on war would teach me to understand and compromise.

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  1. Note that the Art of War is also commonly used in studying business. The tactics, strategies and advice it has is applicable to solving any solution. (I’ve read it too) 😛

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    For people who love to think.

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